5 Comments

  1. 1

    Misha

    Although I’ll disagree about your stand on chef owned restaurants, I hope there are many more in Houston in the future, I had a very similar experience at Textile.

    The service was just as awkward, but even more strange was that Scott Tycer sat in an armchair at the entrance to the dining room and inspected dishes before they were served from his throne. The whole spectacle was rather odd.

    http://www.tasty-bits.com/index.php/2008/12/19/first-taste-of-textile/

    Reply
  2. 2

    jost

    I found the same sort of experience at Bedfords – the ego of the chef overwhelms everything.

    Many years ago, I worked for one of Houstons most famous restaurants. The owner was involved with everything but he was / is smart enough to know that a great dining experience is more than a ego driven menu – it begins when the customer is greeted at the door & ends when they get home and lives even longer when they talk to their friends. I stay away from high profile chef restaurants.

    Reply
  3. 3

    Albert

    Misha, I like chef-owned restaurants, as long as the chef has the talent to run the business as well as to run the kitchen.

    But in my experience, it’s rare. True artists are rarely good business people — they have to much ego tied to the product. And that causes cloudy judgement.

    Reply
  4. 4

    Anonymous

    you are a wanna-be; tycer has forgoten more about food that you will ever know. i have your picture, i have your name.

    Reply
  5. 5

    Albert Nurick

    I've never doubted Tycer's culinary chops; if he'd work on his people skills I think he'd have great success.

    (And the threats coming from some anonymous poster are more than a wee bit tiresome. Disagree with me? Great. But anonymous threats are kinda juvenile, don't you think?)

    Reply

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Textile – Another Tycer Venture Tainted by the Chef’s Attitude

by Albert Nurick time to read: 3 min
5